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Ganamrutha Bodhini English Book Free 68: How to Download and Use It for Learning Carnatic Music


Ganamrutha Bodhini English Book Free 68: A Comprehensive Guide for Beginners in Carnatic Music




Carnatic music is one of the oldest and most sophisticated forms of classical music in the world. It originated in South India and has a rich history and tradition of over two thousand years. Carnatic music is based on a complex system of ragas (melodic modes) and talas (rhythmic cycles) that create a variety of musical expressions and emotions.




Ganamrutha Bodhini English Book Free 68



If you are interested in learning Carnatic music, you might be wondering where to start. There are many books and resources available for learning Carnatic music, but one of the most popular and widely used ones is Ganamrutha Bodhini. Ganamrutha Bodhini is a book that contains the essential lessons and exercises for beginners in Carnatic music. It covers the basics of swaras (notes), sruti (pitch), laya (tempo), gamakas (ornaments), ragas, talas, sahitya (lyrics) and bhava (expression).


In this article, we will give you a comprehensive guide on Ganamrutha Bodhini English Book Free 68, which is an updated version of the original book written in Tamil by Sangeetha Vidwan A.S. Panchapakesa Iyer. We will explain what Ganamrutha Bodhini is, who is the author, what are the contents, and how to use it effectively for learning Carnatic music. We will also provide you with some tips and tricks for practicing the lessons and exercises in Ganamrutha Bodhini.


Swaravali Varisais: The Basic Exercises of Carnatic Music




The first section of Ganamrutha Bodhini consists of swaravali varisais, which are the basic exercises of Carnatic music. Swaravali varisais are sequences of swaras that help you to familiarize yourself with the seven notes of the saptaswara system: Sa, Ri, Ga, Ma, Pa, Dha and Ni. Swaravali varisais also help you to develop your sruti and laya skills, which are essential for singing in tune and in rhythm.


There are 14 swaravali varisais in Ganamrutha Bodhini, each with a different pattern of ascending and descending swaras. The first seven varisais are in the raga Mayamalavagowla, which is the basic raga for learning Carnatic music. The next seven varisais are in different ragas, such as Sankarabharanam, Kalyani, Kharaharapriya, Mohanam, Hindolam and Saveri. The varisais are also in different talas, such as Adi, Rupaka, Jhampa and Triputa.


Here are some tips on how to practice swaravali varisais:



  • Start with the first varisai and practice it slowly and steadily until you can sing it without any mistakes. Then move on to the next varisai and repeat the process.



  • Use a sruti box or a tanpura to maintain the correct pitch while singing. You can also use a metronome or a tala app to keep the correct tempo while singing.



  • Sing each varisai in three speeds: vilamba kala (slow), madhyama kala (medium) and durita kala (fast). This will help you to improve your laya skills and flexibility.



  • Sing each varisai in different sthayis (octaves): mandra sthayi (lower), madhya sthayi (middle) and tara sthayi (higher). This will help you to expand your vocal range and clarity.



  • Sing each varisai in different ragas and talas as given in Ganamrutha Bodhini. This will help you to learn the characteristics and nuances of different ragas and talas.



Alankaras: The Ornamental Patterns of Carnatic Music




The second section of Ganamrutha Bodhini consists of alankaras, which are the ornamental patterns of Carnatic music. Alankaras are combinations of swaras that create melodic movements and variations. Alankaras also help you to learn the gamakas, which are the subtle modulations and inflections of swaras that give Carnatic music its distinctive flavor and beauty.


There are 35 alankaras in Ganamrutha Bodhini, each with a different type of gamaka. The types of gamakas are: jaru (glide), sphurita (hammer-on), kampita (vibrato), nokku (pluck), orikkai (oscillation), rava (shaking), tiripa (pull-off), odugai (slide) and eka jaru (single glide). The alankaras are also in different ragas and talas as given in Ganamrutha Bodhini.


Here are some tips on how to practice alankaras:



  • Start with the first alankara and practice it slowly and carefully until you can sing it with the correct gamaka. Then move on to the next alankara and repeat the process.



  • Listen to recordings or live performances of Carnatic music by reputed artists to understand how they use gamakas in their singing. Try to imitate their style and expression while singing alankaras.



  • Sing each alankara in three speeds: vilamba kala, madhyama kala and durita kala. This will help you to master the gamakas at different tempos.



  • Sing each alankara in different sthayis: mandra sthayi, madhya sthayi and tara sthayi. This will help you to apply the gamakas at different pitches.



  • Sing each alankara in different ragas and talas as given in Ganamrutha Bodhini. This will help you to explore the gamakas in different musical contexts.



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